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Brighton & Hove Jewish Housing Association

The Association was founded in 1969 by the Brighton & Hove Jewish Board of Guardians in response to the growing need for subsidised housing for Jewish people of limited means. Originally known as the Brighton & Hove Jewish Board of Guardians Housing Association, it adopted its current name in 1980. The Housing Association was to… Read more »

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The Association was founded in 1969 by the Brighton & Hove Jewish Board of Guardians in response to the growing need for subsidised housing for Jewish people of limited means. Originally known as the Brighton & Hove Jewish Board of Guardians Housing Association, it adopted its current name in 1980.

The Housing Association was to be engaged exclusively in managing its estate and independent of any influence by the Board of Guardians, which would focus on its primary charitable purpose of relieving poverty and hardship. To this day the Association remains under the management of a dedicated committee of volunteers.

Two prominent members of the community, Barney Oberman and Cyril Fraser undertook the search for suitable properties. 10 Holland Road was purchased in 1969, and a year later 23 Vallance Gardens was acquired, each with a loan from the local authority.

Holland Road was named after Harry Jacobs, the long-serving honorary secretary of the Board of Guardians and Vallance Gardens was designated Oberman House to mark the outstanding community service by that family. Finally in 1977, 1 New Church Road was acquired with the help of a loan from the Housing Corporation and named Cyril Fraser House.

Today those properties provide 18 sheltered dwelling units, and the tenants are supported by a part-time scheme manager employed by the Association.

In later years, the Jewish Welfare Board received two substantial legacies which led to the ownership of properties in Westbourne Villas (1989) and Carlisle Road (1995) on condition that they were used to provide accommodation for needy Jewish people.

The properties are managed by the Housing Association, on behalf of the Brighton & Hove Jewish Welfare Board, which receives the rent and is responsible for all the expenses. The eight units are not sheltered and have no scheme manager.

Although independent of the Welfare Board, our complementary roles help to ensure that those members of the community who need help with their housing can find accommodation in well managed accessible locations. The need for this service is unlikely to diminish in the years to come.

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